oregano oil

Oregano Oil – A Powerful Herb, Little Known and Little Used

Oregano, Thymus capitatus or origanum vulgare

What is Oregano Oil:

Oregano oil was first used in ancient Greece to treat a variety of infectious diseases. Since then, its popularity has grown and it is considered, among many herbalists, as one of the most effective naturally occuring broad-spectrum antibiotics available. Its marked antimicrobial effects against bacteria, yeast, filamentous fungi and even viruses, make it an excellent herb to consume when an individual is exposed to an illness of which the disease mechinism is unknown (think: kid that hacks in your face and you have no idea what he’s sick with).1)Chen, John K., Ph.D, PharmD, OMD, LAc. 2012. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry: Art of Medicine Press, Inc. The primary constituants, Carvacrol and Thymol, are so powerful that it is shelf stable without added preservatives, and research has shown them to fight staphylococcus, campylobacter, e.coli, giardia, pseudomonas and salmonella among others.2)Reichling J., Schnitzler, P., Suschke, U., Saller, R. (2009). Essential Oils of Aromatic Plants with Antibacterial, Antifungal, Antiviral, and Cytotoxic Properties – an Overview. Retrieved Dec 6, 2015, from Karger; Medical and Scientific Publishers: https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/207196

How do you use Oregano Oil:

Three capsules of Oregano oil taken 2 times daily upon initial exposure to an illness is typically sufficient to ward off even the toughest ills. If symptoms develop after the first day’s dosage, please seek medical advice from a qualified practitioner.

What else do I need to know:

Individuals who have allergies to the Lamiaceae family (which includes mint, basil, and lavender) shoulder avoid consuming Oregano Oil. Children under the age of 7 should avoid oral consumption in favor of mixing it with a carrier oil and applying it to the soles of the feet. Women who are pregnant or nursing should seek medical advice prior to use, and still, use with caution.

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References   [ + ]

1.Chen, John K., Ph.D, PharmD, OMD, LAc. 2012. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry: Art of Medicine Press, Inc.
2.Reichling J., Schnitzler, P., Suschke, U., Saller, R. (2009). Essential Oils of Aromatic Plants with Antibacterial, Antifungal, Antiviral, and Cytotoxic Properties – an Overview. Retrieved Dec 6, 2015, from Karger; Medical and Scientific Publishers: https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/207196